Barbecuing The Egghead Way

By now, the debate between charcoal and gas grills is getting old. You’ve heard both sides repeatedly argue the benefits and drawbacks of the grills and perhaps someone even worked up the courage to throw in a defense for an electric grill. There is another option that may only be brought up in circles of die-hard grilling enthusiasts: the Big Green Egg. While taking your online cooking courses, you may have heard about this ceramic grill but not thought much of it initially. However, this grill has a huge cult following that swears by the Egg for all their outdoor cooking needs.

History of the Big Green Egg
The Big Green Egg was first created in 1974 by a former U.S. Navy lieutenant. He got the inspiration for the Big Green Egg from Japanese clay charcoal cookers, known as kamados, while serving in Japan during World War II. After initially trying to sell kamados, they were “Americanized” into their current form in order to better appeal to U.S. consumers. Since then, the Big Green Egg has been slowly sweeping across the country with a cult movement of professional and backyard barbecuers alike. Enthusiasts, or “eggheads” as they affectionately call themselves, gather for Big Green Egg barbecue “eggfests” and post in online forums on “eggsites​.” All are welcome at the gatherings and egg puns are highly encouraged.

What’s so great about the Big Green Egg?
The Big Green Egg can be used to cook a wide range of foods, from ribs and steaks to pizzas and cinnamon rolls. The smoky flavors give pies and other unconventional grilled foods a uniquely satisfying flavor that anyone at the culinary academy would be tempted to experiment with. Its versatility is a result of the Egg’s ability to be used as a grill, smoker, brick oven or even convection oven. These barbecuers are hailed as the superior grill by devotees because they claim to light faster, require less fuel, heat more evenly and produce meats with mouthwatering, juicy tenderness. The Egg also uses lump charcoal, rather than briquettes, which is often touted as an “all-natural fuel source.” The temperature is controlled with precision by two vents in the top of the Egg that are easy to master, especially with all the “eggstra” support and tips from the online community.

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